Tag Archives: mobilities

Book Review Essay: A Jensenian Approach to Mobilities

Simon Cook‘s recent contribution to the Journal of Transport Geography is an essay style book review focused on Ole  Jensen‘s books examining mobilities: Staging Mobilities; and Designing Mobilities.

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He identifies the former as a more conventional academic text and the latter as ‘part academic-, part coffee-table book’.  He recommends each book as a strong introduction to contemporary mobilities for transport geographers with consideration for the interdisciplinarity, yet  feels only one fully achieves its aims.  Read Cook’s full review here.

This review is published with the kind permission of Elsevier. It is  also available via Science Direct, published in The Journal of Transport Geography, Vol 52, Simon Cook, A Jensenian approach to mobilities: (1) Staging Mobilities Ole B. Jensen. 2013. Routledge, Abingdon. (£85.00 (hardback). ISBN: 978–0-415-69,373-8). (2) Designing Mobilities Ole B. Jensen. 2014. Aalborg, Aalborg University Press. (£37.00 (hardback). ISBN: 978–87-7112-098-1)

Book review: The Routledge Handbook of Mobilities by Peter Adey, David Bissell, Kevin Hannam, Peter Merriman, Mimi Sheller (Eds.)

Susan Pringle reviewed The Routledge Handbook of Mobilities, edited by Peter Adey, David Bissell, Kevin Hannam, Peter Merriman, and Mimi Sheller.

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In her review she highlights that:

“The gamut of topics [in the book] runs from the tangible to the intangible, from the manufacture, and meaning, of the seemingly ubiquitous Hawaiian pizza through to the pathways taken by an invisible virus as it travels through populations.”

To find out more read the review in full here.

This review is published with the kind permission of Elsevier. It is also available via Science Direct, published in The Journal of Transport Geography, Vol 45  Susan Pringle, The Routledge Handbook of Mobilities, Peter Adey, David Bissell, Kevin Hannam, Peter Merriman, Mimi Sheller. Routledge, Abingdon (2013). £140, ISBN: 978-0-415-66771-5 (hardback); £140, ISBN: 978-1-315-85757-2 (ebook) pages 81-82, Copyright Elsevier (2015).

Book Review: New Mobilities Regimes in Art and Social Sciences, S. Witzgall, G. Vogl, S. Kesselring (Eds).

Juliet Jain reviewed New Mobilities Regimes in Art and Social Sciences edited by Susanne WitzgallGerlinde Vogl, and Sven Kesselring.

 

 

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As detailed in her review, available here, Jain found the essays that ‘deal with migration and contested lands’ most interesting, though recognises that the more prosaic mobility practices are ‘not without their own risks’.  She also reflects on how art and art practices can be useful to a range of audiences in understanding behaviours, including for academics with’ cross and trans-disciplinary teams being encouraged’.

This review is published with the kind permission of Elsevier. It is also available via Science Direct, published in The Journal of Transport Geography, Vol 43, Juliet Jain, New Mobilities Regimes in Art and Social Sciences, S. Witzgall, G. Vogl, S. Kesselring. Ashgate, Farham Surrey (2013). ISBN: 9781409450924 pages 190-191, Copyright Elsevier (2015)

Book Review: Landscapes of Mobility: Culture, Politics and Placemaking, Arijit Sen, Jennifer Johung (Eds.).

Gordon Pirie‘s review of Landscapes of Mobility: Culture, Politics and Placemaking edited by Arijit Sen and Jennifer Johung highlights specifically the chapters of this mobilities focused book which are likely to be of most interest to transport geographers.  He then discusses the content more widely, returning to what transport geographers can learn from dipping into this book.

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Read the full review here and respond to Pirie’s invitation to ‘Take a moment to cross-fertilise’, and then perhaps contribute towards a parallel book from a transport geography perspective.

This review is published with the kind permission of Elsevier. It is also available via Science Direct, published in The Journal of Transport Geography, Vol 41, Gordon Pirie, Landscapes of Mobility: Culture, Politics and Placemaking, Arijit Sen, Jennifer Johung (Eds.). Ashgate, Burlington (2013). $109.95 (Hardback) ISBN: 978-1-4094-4282-3,  page 348, Copyright Elsevier (2014)

Barriers to cycling and policy implications

This was a fascinating presentation delivered by Ann Jopson from Leeds Institute of Transport Studies (ITS) at an event entitled “The Challenges of Sustainable Mobility in our Cities”. In it, new data is presented on people’s attitudes towards cycling and explanations as to why so few people do cycle regularly despite widespread positive intentions surrounding active travel. The event was not filmed; fortunately I brought my audio recorder along and Ann kindly sent me the slides, allowing an audio-visual slide sharing experience. So please see below, sit back and enjoy the talk.

Continue reading Barriers to cycling and policy implications

‘The Geography of Business Travel’ session at RGS 2013

The last TGRG session of the conference, ‘The Geography of Business Travel’, comprised a range of papers, from theoretical studies drawing on a range of disciplines, to empirical research based on primary and secondary data, then further to a presentation of a practical tool available to support decision making.

It commenced by exploring the how the practice of business travel has become ingrained in society despite compelling reasons to find alternatives to travel.  James Faulconbridge outlined how market development, the marketing of travel alternatives and the image associated with business travel are challenges to countering this trend.  The company car, a key contributor to business and in some cases leisure travel, was the focus of the next presentation.  Using a London-centric approach, Scott Le Vine answered questions such as ‘How, when and where are company cars used?’ and considered what access to a company car means for household as well as individual travel.  In considering the procurement practices relating to business travel, Paul Adderley presented a tool designed to consider the door-to-door travel and mobility options with consideration for environmental costs.  The tool identifies the range of options providing information about the impact of each; it includes the option not to travel (using a technological alternative) and also recognises that private vehicles may provide part of the solution.  Lisa Davison then examined the characteristics of business travellers who fly as part of their work, highlighting the difficulties in responding to a homogeneous business air travel segment, where in reality a range of sub-segments exist.  The interrelatedness of business and personal travel formed the focus of Kate Pangbourne’s presentation, which emphasised the need to better understand how individual and organisational factors come together, so as to better inform business practices and inform transport policy.

As the conference drew to a close, presenters dashed for their trains or engaged in activities typified by the ‘leisure’ tourism segment thus demonstrating some of the complexities of the geography of business travel.

Continue reading to view a selection of the presentations from the session. Continue reading ‘The Geography of Business Travel’ session at RGS 2013