Category Archives: Uncategorized

Book review: Velotopia: The Production of Cyclespace in Our Minds and Our Cities,

Samuel Nello-Deakin reviewed Velotopia: The Production of Cyclespace in Our Minds and Our Cities by Steven Fleming.

He provides an interesting critique of the book, suggesting Fleming’s idea of velotopia raises more questions than answers.  The full review is available here.

This review is published with the kind permission of Elsevier. It is  also available via Science Direct, published in The Journal of Transport Geography, Volume 63, 2017. Samuel Nello-Deakin, Book Review: Velotopia: The Production of Cyclespace in Our Minds and Our Cities, S. Fleming. nai010 Publishers, Rotterdam (2017).
(£23.00 (paperback) ISBN: 978-94-6208-352-3)

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Global Challenges in Transport Programme: Health, Wellbeing and Transport course (5-8 December 2017)

We have a few places still available on the Health, Wellbeing and Transport course, to be held Tuesday 5th- Friday 8th December 2017, at Kellogg College, University of Oxford.

The course is part of our Global Challenges in Transport programme, which provides researchers and practitioners with the necessary knowledge, skills and expertise, supported by the latest research evidence, to address the complexity associated with making transport sustainable.

This course considers health, wellbeing and social equity across spatial scales, geographical contexts and transport modes. It specifically concentrates on the relationships between urban form and design, mobility practices, and physical and mental well-being. Particular emphasis will be placed on the potential contribution of walking, cycling and public transport services to healthy cities.
Our speakers include: Dr Tim Schwanen (TSU), Prof Karen Lucas (ITS), Dr Jennie Middleton (TSU), Dr Christian Brand (TSU), Dr James Esson (Loughborough University), Dr Margaret Peden (The George Institute for Global Health), Dr Audrey de Nazelle (Imperial College London), Emma Aldrich (Marie Stopes Uganda), Dr Adrian Davis.

The full programme is available at: http://www.tsu.ox.ac.uk/course/hwt2017.pdf

This is a 4-day residential course, with fees covering all materials, 21 contact hours, and 3 night’s en-suite accommodation at Kellogg College, University of Oxford. All meals and refreshments are provided. The fee structure is as follows:

· Private sector: £3,500
· Public sector: £1,500
· PhD: £500

We are able to offer partial scholarships to a limited number of participants, as well as discounts to those attending several Global Challenges in Transport courses.

Further details about all courses in the Global Challenges in Transport programme can be found at www.tsu.ox.ac.uk/course

To enquire or apply, please email exed@tsu.ox.ac.uk

Global Challenges in Transport programme at the University of Oxford: Governing Transitions in Urban Transport (27 – 30 June 2017)

The Transport Studies Unit at the University of Oxford is currently accepting applications for the Governing Transitions in Urban Transport course, to be held 27th – 30th  June 2017, at Kellogg College, University of Oxford.

The course is part of our Global Challenges in Transport programme, which provides researchers and practitioners with the necessary knowledge, skills and expertise, supported by the latest research evidence, to address the complexity associated with making transport sustainable. Specifically the Governing Transitions in Urban Transport course explores how technological, behavioural and institutional transitions in urban transport can be facilitated and steered through policy and planning.

Our speakers include: Prof David Banister (TSU), Prof Glenn Lyons (UWE Bristol), Dr Jennie Middleton (TSU), Dr Tim Schwanen (TSU), Dr Louise Reardon (ITS Leeds), Dr Michael Synnott (WBS), Dr James Palmer (TSU). The full programme is available at www.tsu.ox.ac.uk/course

This is a 4-day residential course, with fees covering all materials, 21 contact hours, and 3 night’s en-suite accommodation at Kellogg College, University of Oxford. All meals and refreshments are provided (including a welcome lunch, a formal networking dinner and an end-of-course dinner). The fee structure is as follows:

  • Corporate rate: £3,500
  • Academic/Public sector rate: £1,500
  • PhD rate: £500

We are able to offer partial scholarships to a limited number of participants, as well as discounts to those attending several Global Challenges in Transport courses.

Further details about all courses in the Global Challenges in Transport programme can be found at www.tsu.ox.ac.uk/course

To enquire or apply, please email exed@tsu.ox.ac.uk

‘New Technologies and Changing Behaviours’ short course at the University of Oxford (14 – 17 March 2017), part of the Global Challenges in Transport Leadership programme

We are currently accepting applications for the short course ‘New Technologies and Changing Behaviours,’ taking place 14-17 March 2017, at Kellogg College, University of Oxford.

 Globally, transport is undergoing important changes in technology and user behaviour. This course offers the latest thinking on how such changes can be understood, and what their interactions mean for the future of transport demand. It explores emerging contemporary mobility cultures in different global regions, the diffusion of new technologies and new perspectives on their role, changing behaviours and energy reduction, and the sociocultural dynamics of behaviour change. The course additionally offers an overview of new and emerging smart technologies and behavioural intervention programmes and provides insights into current projects and initiatives across the globe.

Key speakers include: Professor Emeritus David Banister, Professor Denise Morrey (Oxford Brookes University), Dr Debbie Hopkins (TSU), Dr Tim Schwanen (TSU), Toby Park (Behavioural Insights Team), Professor Graham Parkhurst (UWE Bristol), Professor Lorraine Whitmarsh (Cardiff University). The expertise of the speakers spans both developed and developing countries, and research as well as practice.

You can also apply for one of the other four-day courses on the programme. They cover different aspects of the sustainable transport challenge: transport governance and urban transitions (in June 2017), infrastructures, development and finance (in September 2017), and health and well-being (in December 2017). You can find out more at www.tsu.ox.ac.uk/course. Please note that each course can be taken separately, or in combination with others, allowing participants to tailor a flexible programme based on their interests.

The fees per course cover all materials, 21 contact hours, 3 nights’ en-suite accommodation, and all meals and refreshments during the course (including a formal networking dinner at Kellogg College, University of Oxford). In 2016/17, fees are as follows:

  • Private sector: £3,500
  • Public sector / NGO / Academic: £1,500
  • PhD student: £500

We are able to offer reduced rates for group applications, as well as alumni rates to those attending several of the Global Challenges in Transport courses.

The TSU’s Global Challenges in Transport courses are part of the Oxford Leadership Programme and are delivered in collaboration with Saïd Business School. The programme provides decision-makers from a range of sectors with the necessary skills and expertise, supported by the latest research evidence, to address the complex challenges of delivering sustainable transport solutions.

Please get in touch if you have any questions, or would like to request an application form.

 

Call for TGRG session proposals: RGS-IBG Annual International Conference 2017

Dear TGRG members,

The call for sessions and papers for the 2017 RGS-IBG Annual International Conference is now open and we would like to invite TGRG members to submit session proposals for next year’s conference.

The conference will take place at the Royal Geographical Society in London from 29th August- 1st September and will be chaired by Professor Sarah Radcliffe (University of Cambridge). The conference theme is ‘Decolonising geographical knowledges: opening geography out to the world’.  We would particularly encourage sessions around this theme, but sessions relating to any aspect of transport geography will be considered.

If you would like to have your session sponsored by TGRG, please submit your session proposal to S.P.Blainey@soton.ac.uk AND K.J.Pangbourne@leeds.ac.uk by Friday 16th December. We will confirm session sponsorship as soon as possible and you will then have until Friday 17th February to send out your Call for Papers, choose your presenters and submit your full session proposal to RGS.

Please include the following in your session proposal (you do not have to use the AC2016 session proposal form at this stage):

  • A title
  • Names, affiliations and email addresses of the session convenors (we advise TWO)
  • A session abstract (about 200-300 words), and up to five keywords.

Guidance – sessions are scheduled into timeslots of 1 hour 40 minutes long. A session may not normally occupy more than two of these timeslots in the conference programme. TGRG has a ‘ration’ of timeslots, which we will bear in mind when selecting which proposals to sponsor. Please indicate how many high quality papers you think you will attract – four or five (max) ‘traditional’ papers will fit into a timeslot, or you can consider holding a debate, or a workshop, or adopt a different format such as a pecha kucha.

We welcome joint proposals with other groups (who may have a different timeline – please state what that is). For session proposals which attract many high quality submissions, we will consider allowing two timeslots – there are usually 2 or 3 sessions which have two timeslots each.

In addition to promotion of sessions and support in submitting session proposals, one of the benefits of a TGRG sponsored session is that we are given an allocation of guest passes for non-geographers and/or non UK conference participants. Session organisers may suggest names of established speakers for whom the TGRG can potentially offer a free conference pass, assuming the criteria for guest passes are met and subject to our allocation of guest passes. We also have a prize for the best paper by a postgraduate researcher presented in any TGRG sponsored session.

The following link may be useful in proposing your session:

http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/ConferencesAndSeminars/Annual+International+Conference/Annual+international+conference.htm

Best wishes,

Simon Blainey (TGRG Secretary)

Book Review: Challenging Consumption: Pathways to a more Sustainable Future, edited by A.R. Davies, F. Fahy, and H Rau

Danielle Eiseman‘s review of Challenging Consumption: Pathways to a more Sustainable Future, edited by Anna Davies, Frances Fahy, and Henrike Rau, focuses on the transport and mobility related chapters of the book.

Her review discusses how transport is identified as an ‘interconnected network of practices’ and questions the extent to which telework can be classified as a ‘Ecological Modernisation’.  The full review is available here.

challenging-consumption

 

This review is published with the kind permission of Elsevier. It is  also available via Science Direct, published in The Journal of Transport Geography, Vol 55, Danielle Eiseman, Challenging Consumption: Pathways to a more Sustainable Future. Davies A.R., Fahy F., Rau H. (Eds.), 2014. Routledge, Oxon, (£90.00 (Hardback); £29.99 (Paperback), ISBN: 978-0-415-82074-5)