More paper calls

We can confirm three additional sessions for RGS-IBG 2013.

Here are the titles of the sessions and who to contact if you’d like to present at them:

Making new connections:  transport, mobilities and mobile phones in low income countries

Please submit a title and abstract of up to 250 words to Gina Porter r.e.porter@durham.ac.uk by 28th January 2013.

Walking & Cycling – Physical Activity, Sustainable Transport or harsh reality? : The contributions of health and transport geography (with the GHRG)

Please submit a title and abstract of up to 250 words to Lisa Davison (l.davison1@ulster.ac.uk)  and Angela Curl (angela.curl@glasgow.ac.uk) by Friday 1st February.

Seamless Freight Transport

If you are interested in offering a paper on a topic related to this call please email a 200 word Abstract, including your name and affiliation, to Allan Woodburn (a.g.woodburn@westminster.ac.uk) as soon as possible and no later than Friday 25 January.

Click below for full session descriptions of these three sessions of see the other Transport Geography paper calls here or on the RGS-IBG website.

Making new connections:  transport, mobilities and mobile phones in low income countries

Please submit a title and abstract of up to 250 words to Gina Porter r.e.porter@durham.ac.uk by 28th January 2013.

This session focuses on the newly emerging linkages between mobility, transport and mobile phone usage in low income countries.  In the context of an increasingly carbon-constrained world and the search for more sustainable transportation, potential interactions between the expanded virtual mobility facilitated by mobile phones and physical transport services are of great importance.

The remarkable expansion of mobile phone networks in Africa and other low income regions is bringing a tangible new dimension of connectivity into transport and access equations on the ground: now-feasible interactions between virtual and physical mobility are helping to reshape access potential, even in many hitherto remote areas (especially where linked to the rapid uptake of transportation modes such as the motorcycle taxi).  Phones can cut travel costs and time, reducing the number of long, potentially hazardous road journeys on poor roads in badly maintained vehicles, in regions with among the world’s highest accident rates and where highway robbery and other types of harassment associated with travel may be widespread.  This is thus a fruitful time to revisit the access challenges characteristic of low income regions.

 The potential for developing more efficient transport systems through integration of transport with mobile phone communication is substantial.  Face-to-face interaction is often of great significance in low income regions, where personalised relationships are commonly crucial in business.   However, when the value attached to personalized relationships is balanced against factors of widespread poverty and irregular, sometimes very dangerous transport, the potential for some mobile substitution for travel may be greater than in Western contexts.   Better distance management through phone use may also be particularly closely associated with populations with very low disposable incomes, and/or whose physical mobility is limited, for instance by disability, infirmity, age or gender.    This session welcomes papers which interrogates such issues.

Walking & Cycling – Physical Activity, Sustainable Transport or harsh reality? : The contributions of health and transport geography (with the GHRG)

Please submit a title and abstract of up to 250 words to Lisa Davison (l.davison1@ulster.ac.uk)  and Angela Curl (angela.curl@glasgow.ac.uk) by Friday 1st February.

Do people walk and cycle because of the perceived health benefits, because it is seen as sustainable and environmentally friendly or is it simply a necessity for some people, especially in the current economic climate? This call for paper welcomes the submission of papers exploring the contributions of health and transport geographers to research into walking and cycling. This session seeks to draw together a range of methodological perspectives relating to walking and cycling from health and transport geographers.

Research and policy interest surrounding the health benefits of sustainable travel is proliferating with a number of papers focussing on the relationship between the built environment and health outcomes facilitated through these travel modes. Supporting this. the recent NICE public health guidance 41 calls for more to be done to encourage walking and cycling, in recognition of the potential health benefits.

However, much of this interest comes from outside of geography, increasingly it is public health and built environment professionals and researchers who are exploring the role of non-motorised modes. In response this session is designed to bring together geographers working in this field to establish the research being undertaken and create links as well as discussing how we can influence public policy and more theoretically the role of geography. The session convenors welcome range of methodological and critical viewpoints reflecting on walking and cycling.

Seamless Freight Transport

If you are interested in offering a paper on a topic related to this call please email a 200 word Abstract, including your name and affiliation, to Allan Woodburn (a.g.woodburn@westminster.ac.uk) as soon as possible and no later than Friday 25 January.

 

Michael Browne and Allan Woodburn (both of University of Westminster, London) are co-convening a session on Seamless Freight Transport for the 2013 RGS-IBG Conference in London.  Freight transport flows are a major contributor to environmental, social and economic problems.  Seamlessness relates to the optimal use of resources through the implementation of concepts such as modal interconnectivity, innovation and collaboration, with the aim of encouraging sustainable economic growth and enhancing societal welfare.  Within the freight transport arena, this involves initiatives at different geographical scales (e.g. city logistics; cross-border trade; combination of long distance and local freight movements) and involving differing groups of actors from the private and public sectors.

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