Final deadline extension – RGS 2021 abstract call: Coworking spaces: a tool to reduce commuting and enhance well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic

We are now seeking additional abstracts for the forthcoming TGRG-sponsored session at the RGS-IBG AC 2021

**The FINAL deadline is Wednesday 10th March.**

Proposed Session Title:

Coworking spaces: a tool to reduce commuting and enhance well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic

Session convenors:

Dr Thérèse Bajada (University of Malta), Dr Bernadine Satariano (University of Malta, Junior College) and Prof. Ilaria Mariotti (DAStU-Politecnico di Milano)

Session DeliveryVirtual

Proposed session abstract:

Over the last decade, there has been a proliferation of new working spaces and specifically coworking spaces (CSs) in which users (coworkers) work alongside other unaffiliated professionals for a fee and exploit dynamic and inspiring milieu for collaboration and knowledge sharing. The COVID-19 pandemic has altered working lifestyles because of social distancing and other health protocols. Indeed, groups of people, worldwide, are still working from home or searching for a safe and healthy workplace. CSs represent a valuable alternative for remote workers because they offer: 1) access to adequate technology, 2) reduced risks of isolation, 3) reduced costs for employees (i.e. by providing access to a cheaper habitat, or by reducing commuting costs), 4) improved job satisfaction and well-being, 5) enhanced work-life balance, by supplying facilities like baby-sitting, 6) reduced need to commute, and encourage active travel (walking and cycling). CSs, are therefore contributing to a change in urban design that incorporates urban and transport planning because they can be combined with the concept of the 15/20 minute city, whereby people do not need to travel long distances to reach their place of work but commute shorter distances, possibly by means of active travel.

This special session refers to the Cost Action CA18214 “The Geography of new working spaces and the impact on the periphery” (http://www.new-working-spaces.eu/https://www.cost.eu/actions/CA18214), which has created a network of 140 research partners from 33 Countries. The session welcomes abstracts on any theoretically and empirically informed aspects of CSs associated with mobility, work-life balance and wellbeing. The topics invited include but are not restricted to the following:     

• What is the role of CSs in changing the way we travel?

• How can CSs contribute to improving work-life balance and wellbeing in urban contexts?

• To what extent can CSs be related to policy packages to engage in sustainable community behaviour?

• What are the effects of CSs on the economy (keeping in mind the circular economy)?

• How can CSs contribute to the 15-/20-minute city policy concept?

We are developing a proposal for the Journal Research in Transportation Business and Management (RTBM) for a special issue associated with this session.

Abstracts of 200 words including a title, and the names, affiliations and email addresses of all authors should be submitted electronically to therese.bajada@um.edu.mtbernadine.satariano@um.edu.mt and ilaria.mariotti@polimi.it.

We look forward to receiving your abstract.

Kind regards

Therese, Bernadine and Ilaria.

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RGS TGRG session – call for abstracts: Transport Planning and Governance in Times of Crisis – Changing Practices and Effects on Sustainable Transport

Convenors: Kerstin Stark and Julia Schuppan, German Aerospace Center (DLR)

The proposed session is sponsored by the Transport Geography Research Group (TGRG). It takes place online.

The effects of the Covid 19 crisis on urban mobility are diverse and ambivalent. In terms of transportation planning and governance, new practices are being developed. For example, pop-up bike lanes and temporary pedestrian zones are being established, and it appears that these measures are here to stay. In addition, new formats and tools are being tested to facilitate the dialogue between civil society and administration, as well as between different administrative bodies. As a result, classic barriers associated with planning and implementing more pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure could be addressed and reduced. The crisis is also driving the virtualization of collaboration in planning. The functioning and accessibility of the administration are affected: work culture and practices within the administration are under scrutiny and the pressure to modernize increases.

Besides changes in administrative processes there are also changes in planning needs. It is becoming apparent that as more people work from home, the time patterns of transport demand and the rhythms of daily life are changing, and there is a shift towards individual transportation (bicycles and cars). From the perspective of transport policy and administration, the question is how to respond to these developments and how to leverage their benefits and deal with the associated risks for a sustainable mobility transition.

This session calls for conceptual or empirical contributions that address one or several of the following topics:

  • changing practices in transport planning and policy implementation;
  • use of (digital) tools for participation in planning and their costs and benefits;
  • crisis-induced potentials for sustainable mobility planning;
  • digitalization of administration and virtualization of collaborations;
  • local governance in times of crisis;
  • urban and pandemic resilience.

Please submit your abstract of 250 – 300 words by February 26th 2021 to Kerstin Stark, kerstin.stark@dlr.de, and Julia Schuppan, julia.schuppan@dlr.de, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Transport Research.

RGS-IBG conference 2021: Call for submissions on “Current and Emerging Research in Transport”

RGS-IBG Annual International Conference, 31st August to 3rd September 2021 in London.
Sessions sponsored by Transport Geography Research Group.

Session convenors

Zhengyue Wan, UCL London, zhengyue.wan.17@ucl.ac.uk

Franziska Kirschner, Goethe University Frankfurt, franziska.kirschner@yahoo.de

Suzanne Maas, University of Malta, suzanne.m.maas@gmail.com

Call for abstracts

We are inviting abstract submissions from postgraduate students to two TGRG sponsored sessions at the 2021 RGS IBG Annual International Conference titled “Current and Emerging Research in Transport”. The conference will have both in-person (situation permitting) and online sessions, so we are planning one session to be in-person and one online, to accommodate different preferences and travel possibilities.

The sessions are aimed at postgraduate students conducting research in any aspect of transport geography. They are open-themed sessions, but we particularly welcome papers which address the wider conference theme ‘borders, borderlands and bordering’ from a transport perspective. Our event hosts a wide range of presentations and is always well attended. Current and emerging research in transport provides a relaxed, supportive atmosphere for postgraduates at any stage of their research to present their work in progress, to share ideas and to discuss synergies.

The TGRG traditionally rewards a postgraduate prize for the best postgraduate presentation in any TGRG session at the RGS-IBG 2021 Conference. All postgraduate presentations in the “Current and Emerging Research in Transport” session will automatically be eligible for the prize; if you do not want to be considered for the prize, however, please state so in your submission. If you want more information on the postgraduate prize, please get in touch with the TGRG postgraduate representatives (see session convenors above).

If you would like to present a paper in this session, please submit the following information to the session convenors by Friday 5 March at midnight.

  • Title
  • Authors, affiliations and email addresses
  • Presenter
  • Abstract (up to 300 words)
  • Preference for virtual or in-person session (situation permitting, if not: virtual)

RGS TGRG deadline extension: Coworking spaces: a tool to reduce commuting and enhance well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic

**Please note there has been an extension to the deadline to the 24th February.**

We invite abstracts for the forthcoming TGRG-sponsored session at the RGS-IBG AC 2021

Proposed Session Title:

Coworking spaces: a tool to reduce commuting and enhance well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic

Session convenors:

Dr Thérèse Bajada (University of Malta), Dr Bernadine Satariano (University of Malta, Junior College) and Prof. Ilaria Mariotti (DAStU-Politecnico di Milano)

Session DeliveryVirtual

Proposed session abstract:

Over the last decade, there has been a proliferation of new working spaces and specifically coworking spaces (CSs) in which users (coworkers) work alongside other unaffiliated professionals for a fee and exploit dynamic and inspiring milieu for collaboration and knowledge sharing. The COVID-19 pandemic has altered working lifestyles because of social distancing and other health protocols. Indeed, groups of people, worldwide, are still working from home or searching for a safe and healthy workplace. CSs represent a valuable alternative for remote workers because they offer: 1) access to adequate technology, 2) reduced risks of isolation, 3) reduced costs for employees (i.e. by providing access to a cheaper habitat, or by reducing commuting costs), 4) improved job satisfaction and well-being, 5) enhanced work-life balance, by supplying facilities like baby-sitting, 6) reduced need to commute, and encourage active travel (walking and cycling). CSs, are therefore contributing to a change in urban design that incorporates urban and transport planning because they can be combined with the concept of the 15/20 minute city, whereby people do not need to travel long distances to reach their place of work but commute shorter distances, possibly by means of active travel.

This special session refers to the Cost Action CA18214 “The Geography of new working spaces and the impact on the periphery” (http://www.new-working-spaces.eu/https://www.cost.eu/actions/CA18214), which has created a network of 140 research partners from 33 Countries. The session welcomes abstracts on any theoretically and empirically informed aspects of CSs associated with mobility, work-life balance and wellbeing. The topics invited include but are not restricted to the following:     

  • What is the role of CSs in changing the way we travel?
  • How can CSs contribute to improving work-life balance and wellbeing in urban contexts?
  • To what extent can CSs be related to policy packages to engage in sustainable community behaviour?
  • What are the effects of CSs on the economy (keeping in mind the circular economy)?
  • How can CSs contribute to the 15-/20-minute city policy concept?

We are developing a proposal for the Journal Research in Transportation Business and Management (RTBM) for a special issue associated with this session.

Abstracts of 200 words including a title, and the names, affiliations and email addresses of all authors should be submitted electronically to therese.bajada@um.edu.mtbernadine.satariano@um.edu.mt and ilaria.mariotti@polimi.it.

Please note there has been an extension to the deadline for submissions. The new deadline for abstract submissions is 24th February 2021.

We look forward to receiving your abstract.

Kind regards

Therese, Bernadine and Ilaria

RGS 2021 TGRG session – call for papers: The new boundaries and borders of electrified motoring

We invite the proposal of abstracts for consideration for inclusion in our forthcoming TGRG-sponsored session at the RGS 2021 conference:

The New Boundaries and Borders of Electrified ‘Motoring’

Session conveners

Billy Clayton (Centre for Transport and Society, UWE, Bristol) william2.clayton@uwe.ac.uk

Graham Parkhurst (Centre for Transport and Society, UWE, Bristol) graham.parkhurst@uwe.ac.uk

Session abstract

The significant negative environmental and health impacts of tailpipe emissions from fossil fuel vehicles is necessitating a rapid shift towards the development and adoption of Electric Vehicles (EVs). EVs are increasingly common in both commercial and private contexts; EVs now represent an established – albeit still proportionally minor – component of new private vehicle sales in many countries globally, but their uptake is accelerating rapidly.

The advance of electrification into long-established motoring practices has the potential to reconfigure the boundaries and borders of private vehicle use, both in terms of physical trip characteristics and driver behaviour/decision making. At least for the short-medium term, EVs have relative limitations in terms of their battery capacities/driving range and associated necessary recharging infrastructure, when compared to typical Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) vehicles, which benefit from longer driving range and much more fully-established refuelling networks. These differences in EV and ICE capabilities mean that drivers who are switching from an ICE to an EV must adapt some of their driving and travel practices accordingly, and in this way, the boundaries and borders of personal vehicle use are themselves also becoming ‘mobile’, potentially showing seasonality and perhaps a temporary ‘retreat’ in an interval between ICE dominance and EVs for which range is no barrier.

We invite papers that examine these new boundaries and borders of electrified motoring. Some suggested questions/themes include:

  • Is the cognitive map of the electric car-user different from the ICE car-user? Does this influence travel choices for different purpose and distances? Have new boundaries been created? Are journeys routed to favour particular types or networks of charger?
  • Do weather and seasons create variable behavioural boundaries according to real-world battery range? Or are such effects simply expressed as heightened range anxiety?
  • Are there new practical or imagined barriers to car use across different hierarchies of space? For example, is the cross-border ‘motoring’ holiday to France no longer an attractive option?
  • What is the role of informal support networks in addressing these challenges? Are these networks falling in importance as EV ownership shifts from the pioneer frontier to the ownership hinterlands?

Submission instructions

The deadline for abstracts to be proposed for consideration for this session is Friday 19th February 2021. Abstracts should be submitted by email to the session conveners, Billy Clayton and Graham Parkhurst, including:

  • Title
  • Name(s)
  • Affiliation(s)
  • Email address(es)
  • Abstract (up to 200 words)

TSU Oxford: Annual Seminar Series

From January to March 2021, the Transport Studies Unit (TSU) at the University of Oxford will be running its annual seminar series.  Seminars will take place online via Teams. Booking is required. 

For more information please go to https://www.tsu.ox.ac.uk/events

Professor Jillian Anable – University of Leeds

28th January, 1pm: ‘You can’t always get what you want: a reflection on Climate Assembly UK’s deliberations on decarbonising passenger transport’ 

Dr James Esson – Loughborough University

11 February, 1pm: ‘Livelihoods in motion: age-related mobility, transport and livelihoods in the urban Global South’ 

Dr Anna Nikolaeva – University of Amsterdam 

18 Feb, 1pm: ‘Commoning mobility’ 

Dr Amy Lubitow – Portland State University

25 Feb, 4pm: ‘Transportation and Mobility Justice: Race, Class and Gender Intersections in the United States’ 

Dr David Bissell – University of Melbourne 

11 March, 12pm:  ‘Losing investments in mobility transitions: reckoning with loss in the wake of on-demand’ 

All are welcome and we look forward to seeing you there.

The TSU Team

TGRG: the forum for transport geographers worldwide.