CfP: Cycle and bike-sharing accessibility and equity in the changing urban transport landscape, RGS 2018.

The landscape of urban transport is ever changing, and doing it faster than ever, to the point that “disruption is the new normal”. Cycling, cycle infrastructure and public bike sharing schemes are increasingly part of the dynamic urban transport landscape. The benefits of cycling have been widely documented and evidenced but more knowledge is needed to assess whether these benefits are at reach of all the population groups. While cycling, cycle infrastructure and public bike sharing schemes offer the potential to be socially inclusive, shift the focus away from car-based society and provide opportunities for interaction for those marginalised by private car based mobility, the reality is often different. Cyclists in general and users of public bike sharing schemes tend to have higher incomes, high levels of formal education, and are disproportionately white, middle aged and male.

But cycling inequalities are complex. They have been related to the generation of resistance or hostility towards the presence of cyclists or cycling facilities in the streets, known as “bikelash”. They can potentially contribute to gentrification processes, in which only an advantaged part of the society receives the benefits of cycling policies. Newly implemented bicycle paths and bike share schemes have been critiqued on issues of equity and gentrification, particularly in the US.

Inclusive cycling mobilities are related to the use of space, in which power relations take place and need to be considered. Inequality issues become crucial to ensure a transition towards a more sustainable and just mobility future.

We welcome papers exploring accessibility and equity issues for cycling and bike sharing, including, but not limited to:

• Evaluation of cycling, cycling infrastructure and the use of bike share (including dockless schemes) among those likely to be excluded or with additional mobility needs: Elderly, migrants and refugees, women, ethnic minorities, disabled and lower income groups.

• Inclusiveness of new cycling mobility services such as dockless/floating bikeshare schemes and more widely, of the new technologies applied to cycling mobility, for example: the use of apps, sensors, electronic devices.

• Approaches to inclusive urban transport policies relating to cycling and bike sharing.

• Empirical or conceptual papers on cycling inequalities, justice, power relations and inclusivity.

Keywords: cycling, bikesharing, equity, inclusive mobilities, mobility justice.

Please send abstracts of 250-300 words indicating title, author(s) and affiliation(s) by Monday 5 February 2018 to Esther Anaya e.anaya14@imperial.ac.uk, Angela Curl angela.curl@canterbury.ac.nz and Julie Clark Julie.Clark@uws.ac.uk.

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Call for Papers – “Changing Landscapes for Inclusive Mobility: new research insights and future directions” – RGS/IBG 2018

[With apologies for cross posting]

Dear all,

We are inviting abstract submissions from researchers and postgraduate students to the TGRG sponsored session “Changing Landscapes for Inclusive Mobility: new research insights and future directions” at the RGS with IBG Annual International Conference, which will take place from 28 to 31 August 2018 in Cardiff, UK.

Session Convenorsː Professor Karen Lucas, University of Leeds, Dr Daniel Oviedo, University College London, Dr Ersilia Verlinghieri, University of Oxford

With the PGRs at ITS Leeds, UCL Barlett School of Planning and TSU Oxford

Since the late 1990s, it has been well established in the transport geography literatures that full participation in our contemporary societies requires high degrees of mobility. Following the seminal UK SEU report (2003), a large body of international research has highlighted the connection between transport and social exclusion. Despite these early insights, equity concerns are still poorly integrated within transport policy. Challenges remain to change our transport systems to support more inclusive, socially sustainable mobilities that also respect the planetary environmental boundaries.

This session welcomes both theoretical and empirical contributions that discuss the interactions between the mobility landscape and social inequalities in different geographical contexts. Invited topics under the general theme are open, but some suggestions are:

• Relationships between the mobilities, accessibilities and social inclusion landscape and the fractures therein;
• New theoretical perspectives – mobilities turn, urban and transport justice, capabilities approach, future ecologies, political ecology, etc.;
• Novel methods to identify the accessibility and mobility needs, concerns and perceptions of disadvantaged groups;
• The role of mobilities in fostering the livelihoods and wellbeing of local communities;
• Linkages between mobilities, social capital and social exclusion in different geographical contexts, and mobility cultures;
• The social dimensions of sustainable transport policies, and their ability of protecting the rights of future generations;
• Social equity in the context of transport policy and project appraisal and evaluation;
• Including diverse voices and localised participation in transport planning processes.

Full details of the conference can be found here:
http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/ConferencesAndSeminars/Annual+International+Conference/Annual+international+conference.htm

Postgraduate research students are particularly encouraged to submit a paper for this session. TGRG has a small prize for the best postgraduate presentation in any TGRG session at the RGS-IBG 2018 Conference. If you wish to enter for the Postgraduate Prize a full paper should be submitted to the Chair and Secretary of TGRG prior to the conference date for judging. For more information and to find out about entry criteria please contact TGRG postgraduate rep Deborah Mifsud (deborah.mifsud@um.edu.mt).

If you are interested in presenting a paper, please submit an abstract of your work (up to 300 words) along with authors’ names, affiliations and contacts by Friday 9th February 2018 to the session convenors:

• Professor Karen Lucas, University of Leeds, k.lucas@leeds.ac.uk
• Dr Daniel Oviedo, University College London, d.oviedo.11@ucl.ac.uk
• Dr Ersilia Verlinghieri, University of Oxford, ersilia.verlinghieri@ouce.ox.ac.uk

We will aim to advise whether or not papers have been accepted for the session by Friday 23rd February.

Best wishes,

Dr Ersilia Verlinghieri

 

Book Review: City-Hubs: Sustainable and Efficient Urban Transport Interchanges

Chia-Lin Chen reviewed City-Hubs: Sustainable and Efficient Urban Transport Interchanges edited by Andrés Monzón  and Floridea Di Ciommo.

She recognises this edited volume as a ‘timely and useful’ and highlights the key audience as practitioners such as ‘urban planners, transport operators, urban designers [and] business groups.’

You can read the full review here.

This review is published with the kind permission of Elsevier. It is  also available via Science Direct, published in The Journal of Transport Geography, Volume 65, 2017.  City-Hubs: Sustainable and Efficient Urban Transport Interchanges, by Monzón A. and Di Ciommo, F. (Ed.), 2016. Boca Raton: CRC Press (Taylor & Francis Group). (£129 (hardback); £90.3 (e-book). ISBN: 9781498740845).

Book Review: Airspace Closure and Civil Aviation: A Strategic Resource for Airline Managers

Robert Mayer reviewed Airspace Closure and Civil Aviation: A Strategic Resource for Airline Managers by Steven Jaffe.

He found the book focused on constraints as opposed to closure and to be best suited to ‘final year undergraduate and postgraduate students as well as airline managers moving into airline management from other industries’.  This is primarily because it provided a somewhat superficial overview but it did also included some cases which would be of interest to more experienced researchers and practitioners.

The full review is available here.

This review is published with the kind permission of Elsevier. It is  also available via Science Direct, published in The Journal of Transport Geography, Volume 65, 2017. Robert Mayer, Book Review: Airspace Closure and Civil Aviation: A Strategic Resource for Airline Managers by Steven D. Jaffe, 2015, Farnham: Ashgate (£70.00 (Hardback), ISBN: 9781472413000).

Book Review Essay: Cultural perspectives on transport, urban planning and design

Robin Hickman explored the following three books when writing a book review essay on ‘Cultural perspectives on transport, urban planning and design’

He summarises:

‘Each publication deserves a wide readership, by transport and urban planners, in research and practice, and by politicians and wider decision makers’

You can find out more about his perspective on each here.

This review is published with the kind permission of Elsevier. It is  also available via Science Direct, published in The Journal of Transport Geography, Volume 63, 2017. Robin Hickman Book Review Essay: Cultural perspectives on transport, urban planning and design.  Urbanism and Transport. Building Blocks for Architects and City and Transport Planners, H. Holzapfel. Routledge, Abingdon (2015). (ISBN-10: 1138798185, pbk: £38.99); Emergent Urbanism. Urban Planning and Design in Times of Strategic and Systemic Change, T. Haas, K. Olsson. Ashgate, Farnham (2014). (ISBN-10: 1409457273, hbk: £75.00); and Transport, Mobility and the Production of Urban Space, J. Cidell, D. Prytherch. Routledge, Abingdon (2015). (ISBN-10: 1138891347, hbk: £110.00)

Book review: Velotopia: The Production of Cyclespace in Our Minds and Our Cities,

Samuel Nello-Deakin reviewed Velotopia: The Production of Cyclespace in Our Minds and Our Cities by Steven Fleming.

He provides an interesting critique of the book, suggesting Fleming’s idea of velotopia raises more questions than answers.  The full review is available here.

This review is published with the kind permission of Elsevier. It is  also available via Science Direct, published in The Journal of Transport Geography, Volume 63, 2017. Samuel Nello-Deakin, Book Review: Velotopia: The Production of Cyclespace in Our Minds and Our Cities, S. Fleming. nai010 Publishers, Rotterdam (2017).
(£23.00 (paperback) ISBN: 978-94-6208-352-3)

TGRG: the forum for transport geographers worldwide.